Will Stem Cells Bring Promised Relief to Painful Pups?

Arthritis affects more than 12 million of our canine friends.  Some dogs are affected so severely that their owners decide euthanasia is the only option.  Thankfully, new research into stem cells is providing another option to help pets who suffer from arthritis.  But, is this new technology working and is it worth the price?  Watch this video to see if Stem Cell Therapy is helping our painful pups!

Millions of dogs suffer the aches and discomfort of arthritis.  Millions more may be hurting without any obvious signs.  Now, a new science, using cells derived from the pet’s own fat, may bring relief to many painful pooches.

When your pet has arthritis, you can almost feel the pain he is suffering.  You watch as he struggles to rise from his bed, cringe as he slowly ascends the stairs, and you can even hear the creaks and groans as he stretches out before his morning walk.

Keep Your Dog Cool This Summer…

Panting DogEvery year, thousands of dogs will end up at the animal emergency hospital due to heat stroke.  This rapid and extreme rise of body temperature can happen very quickly on the hot, muggy days of summer and even more quickly if the pet is left in the car for just a few moments. Without the proper treatment, many dogs will die.  Learning to recognize the symptoms of heat stroke and a few simple safety tips can help to save your pet’s life.

The owner was frantic. Just an hour before, her Cairn Terrier, Snickers was playing in the yard. Now he was listless and having trouble breathing. Rushing him to the nearest veterinary clinic, a concerned veterinary technician informed her Snicker’s temperature was over 106 degrees – he was suffering from heat stroke. Luckily for Snickers – and with the help of a quick thinking owner and veterinary technician – he recovered.

Katy’s Story: Battling Canine Cancer

Cancer TreatmentHalf of all dogs will develop some sort of cancer in their lifetime and one in four dogs will die.  These are the sad statistics of this dreaded disease that affect people and pets.  Canine cancer is so prevalent that it is the leading killer of dogs over the age of two.  The Canine Cancer Project is now underway to help fun studies aimed at eliminating canine cancer in the next ten to twenty years.

Cancer is a scary, ominous word.  For pet owners, concerns are compounded with millions of dogs diagnosed every year and owners often unaware of treatment options. However, today’s extensive research and educational campaigns are ensuring no dog owner will hear the “c” word again! 

Everyday, Cindy Fleischner lines up her crew of cuddly canines for breakfast. As the four other dogs eat, Cindy pulls Katy, her 12-year- old Shepherd mix aside for a peanut butter treat.

Katy is battling lymphoma and this treat hides her daily dose of chemotherapy drugs. “The other dogs are jealous,” says Fleischner. “But they don’t know the battle she is fighting.”

Just What Kind of Doggie Is That in the Window?

Science is allowing us to take a new and exciting look at our family pets.   The Wisdom Panel® DNA test for dogs is enabling many owners of mixed breed dogs to discover more about their mutts.   Studies show the test to have an 84% accuracy rate in determining your dogs “roots”.   Using technology that may be familiar to CSI viewers, a small amount of blood is taken from your pet and compared to a DNA database to reveal your pet’s ancestors.

Call them mutts or hybrids, mixed breed dogs are definitely one of the most beloved pets.  Some people are proud of their “half Collie, half Shepherd” and others are just as content to call their dog a “Heinz 57”.   But, how do you know what the "mix" is in your mixed breed dog?   More importantly, does it really matter?

Global Warming May Affect Your Dog’s Health

ImageGlobal warming has been blamed for everything from an increase in hurricanes to rising sea levels and polar glacial activity. Could it even be affecting the health and well-being of your dog?

It is estimated that pet owners spent more than $36 billion dollars on their pets in 2006. Despite all the medical care, toys, special diets, and other accessories, far too many dogs still fall victim to a disease that can easily be prevented. The calamity of canine heartworm disease continues to prove deadly to dogs across the United States. What might be worse is that the warming of our planet may actually be contributing to the spread of this disease.